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joshsternberg:

Remember when NYC was a s%&*hole? Most of us can’t because we’re not from here. But these pictures are a good look into some of the grossness that was The Big Apple.
Check Steven Siegel’s photos out on Gothamist.
EDIT: Now with the correct link. Thanks, Kate!

Nice shots. Some of us natives were not alive/don’t remember when this was NYC but our parents remind us on a daily basis.

joshsternberg:

Remember when NYC was a s%&*hole? Most of us can’t because we’re not from here. But these pictures are a good look into some of the grossness that was The Big Apple.

Check Steven Siegel’s photos out on Gothamist.

EDIT: Now with the correct link. Thanks, Kate!

Nice shots. Some of us natives were not alive/don’t remember when this was NYC but our parents remind us on a daily basis.

(Source: joshsternberg)

It’s Alexander Hamilton’s Birthday. Here’s How to Celebrate.
-Take a cab over the Alexander Hamilton Bridge, which crosses the Harlem River and connects Manhattan to the Bronx.
-Take the R to Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn — the neighborhood, not the military base (unless you have credentials like that.) Eat at Arirang, Casa Pepe or the Fort Hamilton Diner.
-Go to his house in Saint Nicholas Park in Harlem. They recently moved it there, and fixed it up. And if you don’t have plans on Saturday, check out the birthday bash the National Park Service is throwing in his honor at the Hamilton Grange.
-Find those rare $10 ATM machines across the city. I saw one two weeks ago on Fulton Street in Bed-Stuy. I saw one a few weeks back at a bodega on Metropolitan Avenue in Middle Village, next to Christ the King High School. Can someone please comment with known locations of Alexander Hamilton Money Machines? (AHMM)
-KH

It’s Alexander Hamilton’s Birthday. Here’s How to Celebrate.

-Take a cab over the Alexander Hamilton Bridge, which crosses the Harlem River and connects Manhattan to the Bronx.

-Take the R to Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn — the neighborhood, not the military base (unless you have credentials like that.) Eat at Arirang, Casa Pepe or the Fort Hamilton Diner.

-Go to his house in Saint Nicholas Park in Harlem. They recently moved it there, and fixed it up. And if you don’t have plans on Saturday, check out the birthday bash the National Park Service is throwing in his honor at the Hamilton Grange.

-Find those rare $10 ATM machines across the city. I saw one two weeks ago on Fulton Street in Bed-Stuy. I saw one a few weeks back at a bodega on Metropolitan Avenue in Middle Village, next to Christ the King High School. Can someone please comment with known locations of Alexander Hamilton Money Machines? (AHMM)

-KH

NYPD. Leonard Freed was a photojournalist who covered news throughout the world — but some of his best work was shooting the boys (and girls) in blue from his hometown, New York City. His photos of police officers in the 1970s are now on display at the Museum of the City of New York, and while things are different — the clothes, the buildings — so much of it is still the same. There’s a cop in an interview room typing up fingerprints; a female police officer playing Duck, Duck Goose with kids; and two protesters handcuffed on the ground.  
-KH
[MCNY]

NYPD. Leonard Freed was a photojournalist who covered news throughout the world — but some of his best work was shooting the boys (and girls) in blue from his hometown, New York City. His photos of police officers in the 1970s are now on display at the Museum of the City of New York, and while things are different — the clothes, the buildings — so much of it is still the same. There’s a cop in an interview room typing up fingerprints; a female police officer playing Duck, Duck Goose with kids; and two protesters handcuffed on the ground.  

-KH

[MCNY]

wnyc:

Happy Birthday Statue of Liberty!

It’s Lady Liberty’s 125th birthday! We’d say she never looked better, but this chick used to be bronze. 

Here’s a complete timeline of the life of the statue, from inception in 1865 to occupation by Vietnam Veterans in 1971 to the re-opening of her crown to the public in 2009 to now.

[Statue of Liberty, NPS.gov]

History of the Internet: Let’s Party! It’s been 42 years since the first ARPANET host-to-host connection between two California colleges created the Internet (here, let this explain.) To celebrate this, the Kleinrock Internet Heritage Site and Archive is holding a "historical reconstruction of the birthplace of the Internet!" The party is on October 29 at Boelter Hall on the UCLA campus, birthplace of the Internet. It’ll feature snacks, beverages, 60s music, Internet pioneers, and a pamphlet!* Let’s celebrate the future, which is now!

*To be as historically accurate as possible, no girls allowed.

-KH

[Internet History]

Guide to Pronunciation in the City. Like the debate over the best bagels or pizza, people love arguing — or trying to figure out — how to pronounce street names and highways all around the city. Names like Spuyten Duyvil, a subsection of Riverdale in the Bronx, come from early Dutch influence in New York. But how many of us speak fluent Dutch? The New York Times has been covering the ways to say things for years, and today, after consulting with historians and experts who speak the languages where the names originate, they’ve come to some sort of conclusion.

Here’s the breakdown!

  • Kosciuszko (the Bridge and the Street): “kash-CHOOV-ska” said very fast
  • Spuyten Duyvil (the neighborhood and the bar): “SPY-ten DYE-vil”
  • Goethals (there’s a street and a bridge):  ”HOOT-huls.”

Cool?

-KH

[NYT]

When he applied, Battle was rejected by police surgeons, supposedly because of a heart murmur, but he passed a medical retest after prominent blacks protested to city officials. He suffered the silent treatment from fellow officers at his West 68th Street station house. A threatening note with a racial epithet and a hole the width of a bullet was left on his bunk.

Samuel Battle faced discrimination, threats, and harassment from fellow officers when he became the first black officer to join the New York Police Department. He later became the NYPD’s first black first black sergeant, lieutenant, and parole commissioner. A century after he joined the force, 18 percent of all police officers in the city are black. Minority officers make up 39 percent of sergeants, 25 percent of lieutenants, and 17 percent of captains. Today, Battle—the first of many— will be honored at the Cadet Corps graduation. 

-KH

[NYT]